Beyond Bacon: beyond beautiful

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I apologize for not having blogified my obsession with Beyond Bacon yet. Summary of my feelings: I sleep with it under my pillow and I talk to it when I’m alone. I never put it down: it’s basically my Pig Blankie (not to be confused with Pig-in-a-Blanket).

Earlier today, I grabbed some pig’s feet from the deep-freeze and realized that if it weren’t for the Paleo Parents, I wouldn’t have re-discovered my love for not just good, high-quality bacon, but all things Pig. I’m not sayin’ I’m good at cooking any of it, but I love to learn about cooking, think about cooking, and ultimately make valiant efforts to enjoy the process and, hopefully, create something delicious.

(This all gives added meaning to the phrase burnt ends.)

Beyond Bacon

This book is really phenomenal, both aesthetically and because of the incredible content. It’s a book that’s wonderful to hold (sorry, but Kindle just doesn’t impart those warm fuzzy feelings) and it’s wonderful to learn from. While many of us are familiar with the cowshare, sometimes the “Whole Hog” is neglected in favor of a few parts. *coughbaconcough*

Speaking of bacon: we chatted recently on the Balanced Bites Podcast with Pete’s Paleo founders Pete and Sarah Servold. Pete spoke eloquently about his lessons from culinary school – the most important: making use of the whole animal. (Part of the reason I love their bacon so much.)

I can’t do much but thank Stacy and Matt for writing this book. It was one that desperately needed to be written. They not only provide amazing recipes, from lard and sausage to pork head and heart, but they educate the reader on questions to ask, myths and truths about pork, and why knowing and caring where your food comes from is not just a necessity, but a mandate.

Four hooves “up” to Beyond Bacon. (Click on the photo to be taken to the Amazon listing!)

Comments

  1. Richard says

    That book looks awesome; is now on my long list of winter reading.

    On a slightly related topic have you come across the Farmstead Meatsmith website in your online travels? (http://www.farmsteadmeatsmith.com/). If you look at nothing else watch the Harvest Day video. It’s a tiny bit graphic (it is about butchery after all), but nothing an honest meat eater should squirm at. I wish I had artisan butcher friends.

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