The Gluten Made Her Do It. (No, seriously.)

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A pretty compelling piece, and one that begs a few questions:

What deeply-embedded prejudices cause our tunnel vision about what leads to health? And WHAT’S THE FREAKIN’ BIG DEAL ABOUT ELIMINATING GLUTEN? JUST DO IT! (This family did, and it paid dividends!)

Does ANY medical professional deserve 100% of our unquestioned trust, given the clear lack of knowledge about nutritional inputs and health?

Should our own instinct always be prioritized first, even if a doctor isn’t on the same page? (And WHY do we feel we need an “official” diagnosis before making our OWN health decisions?)

Why are we so skeptical that a problem or issue could affect us personally, even when it clearly runs in our family?

 

From Anchorage Press.

 

Comments

  1. says

    Awesome link, Liz!

    I wish every parent with a “difficult” (for lack of a better word) child would find information like this.

    Going gluten-free isn’t easy in our society, and is probably even harder when both parents work and have less time for real cooking, but it *can* be done, and if it tears down the walls some of these kids are trapped behind, it’s worth every bit of effort.

    And I think the author has a good point: that gluten-free is starting to be seen as just some fad or the “in” thing right now makes it harder for people to acknowledge that there really could be something to it. So many parents are probably deterred for no other reason than it just sounds silly — unless, of course, you know anything about the human body and brain work! ;-)

    Also, I imagine a lot of parents *do* believe that GF is a solution for *some* kids, but they conclude it doesn’t work for theirs because they tried it and it didn’t help. That’s probably the result of gluten being in damn near everything, and the food labels being so misleading. You can *think* you’re GF, but not realize how much of it you’re taking in from places you’d never suspect.

    It’s a jungle out there. I only wish that all parents who are struggling with behavioral stuff in their children would get their hands on some of the testimonials about Paleo and children’s psychological health. No child should have to be medicated (often to no avail anyway) because of a lack of information on the part of their parents or their doctors.

  2. says

    Wow! Thank you SO MUCH for this link! I had fallen off the paleo band wagon for the last two weeks, and been trying to find motivation to get back on properly and this reminded me of so many reasons why I do paleo – I had been praying for someone to post an article about gluten to help me get back on track! I’m back!!

    I can see so much of Mary Jean reflected in me – I would literally LOOSE MY FREAKING MIND over stupid stupid little things – anything could set me off. However I was one of those kids whose parents don’t believe in the power of diet changing – so I was one of those kids who got multiple diagnosis, drugged and managed until I finally made the change myself at 21! Life changing!!! Seriously crazy!

    THANK YOU!!

  3. says

    This is an amazing story. I have been on-and-off gluten-free for several years, but just recommitted myself to it for the new year. It’s amazing how much it affects the mood and stability of adults, too :)

    And it’s sad that the real reprocussions of eating gluten are not taken seriously by society at large.
    Thank you for posting!

  4. Chrissy says

    I cried when i read your entry, and the article. It amazes me how food…FOOD, such a SIMPLE CONCEPT…could literally change my life, my daughter’s life, my family’s life.

    My 4 yr old daughter, Cassie, is autistic. When she was diagnosed, the first thing everyone told me (well, ok, the second thing; the first was, “Let’s have a drink.”) “Have you thought of trying a gluten free diet?” And I, like Mary Jean’s mother, pooh poohed it. GF was a trend, GF was something that helped those whose discomfort manifested in stomach discomfort, not neural or sensory/emotional. After her first year in an autism preschool, I pooh poohed it again – how could I know if the 6 hrs a day, intensive ABA therapy preschool was helping her, or the food?

    Then I took the paleo challenge, on the gentle advice of a friend, for my own well being.

    And then the angels sang a song of clarified butter, grass fed beef, and plantains fried in coconut oil.

    *I* felt better. *I* was sleeping better. *I* was thinking more clearly. It felt as though I was wearing glasses, that finally were clean and clear again.

    *I* needed to do this for my little girl.

    So I am at the end of my 30 day Paleo challenge, which is really going to be a 325,582 day challenge (or however many days I live on this earth; I’d like to think more in terms of ELEVENTY FLOBBITY JILLION DAYS, but I digress), and my husband and I are ready to transition baby girl into this world. Because it works.

    Because gluten DOES make you do it. And makes you blind.

    THANK YOU….for all your do…because you guys bring info to the masses, you change lives, you give us hope and HEALTH, and the potential to live ELEVENTY FLOBBITY JILLION more days.

    <3 Chrissy

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